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Classic Truck Discussion Forum

OT - waterlogged Mustang

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JDnTN

09-03-2014 09:15:32




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Friend hydro-planed a 2005 V-6 convertible down into a stream and got out before water rose over the hood for a couple of hours. What would be salvage value?? Cloth top is in good shape and body/frame is in pretty good shape (few dings). KBB value before was $6000. Tow guy is offering $525, which covers the roll-back, wrecker and storage. Don"t think he really is in the salvage business. Thanks.

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Bud Tierney

09-05-2014 22:28:44




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 Re: OT - waterlogged Mustang in reply to JDnTN, 09-03-2014 09:15:32  
Shadetree: My experience with submerged cars etc was all in NMex, generally tourists camped in dry draws (nice soft sand) who didn't realize all that pretty lightning up in the hills would sometimes send 2-3-4 feet of water down...
Or locals who bet they could cross a flooded draw once too often (the once was with me in the car...tends to make you spooky on the subject)...
So that water was all heavily silted with fine, fine silt, making me ultra-conservative on the point...
I'd heard the hurricane cars were bad news, but thought primarily because smell came up whenever it rained...live and learn...

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ShadetreeRet

09-06-2014 21:18:58




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 Re: OT - waterlogged Mustang in reply to Bud Tierney, 09-05-2014 22:28:44  
Bud, I have read about happenings like that. That would mess one up in a hurry. It all boils down to the fact that if a vehicle is submerged in water it is risky business. Evey year after bad storms or hurricanes, ( I live in NC, so we are familiar with hurricanes) I read articles cautioning people about looking a vehicle over before buying, because of possible flood damage. Kinda like the dealership where I once worked. The owner would purchase lease and rental vehicles from northern states where they use a lot of salt in the winter. Our techs then had to inspect them and perform any needed repairs. You have never hears so much cussing in your life, because if a vehicle only needed front brake pads, chances were that one or two bolts would be so corroded that they would break and have to be drilled out. I guess it all boils down to that popular Latin phrase, Caveat Emptor, (Buyer beware).

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gene1605

09-04-2014 23:35:56




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 Re: OT - waterlogged Mustang in reply to JDnTN, 09-03-2014 09:15:32  
[quote=

"JDnTN"](reply to post at 14:15:32 09/03/14) [/quote] JD, My Son's truck went through the ice in 50 ft. of water it was in for 4 months until the ice was about 36 in. we lifted it out towed it home, cleaned the mud of the engine and inside the cab, and had it running in one hr. We drained the water from the gear boxes, and did nothing else, It was a old slant six dodge and it had electorical problems after but all the late 70ies cars had problems
Gene

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Bud Tierney

09-04-2014 22:29:22




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 Re: OT - waterlogged Mustang in reply to JDnTN, 09-03-2014 09:15:32  
"Down into a stream"---go down into the stream where the car was and (if flowing conditions are same as when car was submerged) scoop up a couple bucketsfull of water---preferably with a CLEAN white inside finish bucket, and let them settle for a day or two...
What you"re looking for is the amount of fine silt in the water---the same"ll be in all the running gear that water got into...
With all due respect to Shadetree, if that stream was running any silt at all you"re looking at either a complete teardown to clean or gambling on excessive, possibly rapid, wear, as well as possible problems already mentioned...

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ShadetreeRet

09-05-2014 10:29:53




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 Re: OT - waterlogged Mustang in reply to Bud Tierney, 09-04-2014 22:29:22  
Bud, you make a good point, and I guess everything is a gamble, but other than the electrical system, or maybe I should say, "electronics", I personally would chance flushing the engine and running gear, based on the experience that I had with the lawn and garden equipment. This stuff was in a flash flood, so you know how much silt and contaminants were in that water. I purchased 6hp shredder myself and wore it out without any problems from the flood. Other employees purchased tractors, mowers, etc. without problems. As I said, I will give you the point, and will admit that today's vehicles have more that can suffer damage than in older days, but still, you constantly see warnings about checking a vehicle for signs of flood damage, so obviously someone is cleaning them up and selling them.

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cole in mo.

09-04-2014 17:42:17




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 Re: OT - waterlogged Mustang in reply to JDnTN, 09-03-2014 09:15:32  
The engine may be junk, if it was up to temp when it went under water, the pistons may be seized. The plugs will need to be pulled, then see if it will turn over. The whole fuel system will need to be flushed, all the wiring dried, computer may be fried. The rear end as well as the trans will be full of water, Its not just a clean this and wipe that off thing.



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ShadetreeRet

09-03-2014 21:25:30




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 Re: OT - waterlogged Mustang in reply to JDnTN, 09-03-2014 09:15:32  
If it was only submerged for a couple of hours or so, and it just recently happened, there is a good possibility that most of the vehicle could be salvaged. I mean, if the stream wasn't contaminated to the point of being smelly or such, I would carefully remove the upholstery, seat and all, and "hang it out to dry". Clean the fuel tank, change all the fluids and see if it will start. Run it for a while and change the fluids again. You may be surprised at just how little damage was done. I say this because my daughter had a 93 Mustang that caught fire inside. Most of the upholstery had to be replaced, but the boys in clean-up at the dealership removed the carpet and scrubbed it a couple of times and let it lay in the sun for a couple days. Re-installed it and it smelled OK. Also, years ago, a Sears sales office was flooded during a sudden downpour. They sent trucks and loaded all appliances and hard goods and brought them back to the Mail Order plant where I worked. Now the lawn and garden equipment had water inside the engines and transmissions for well over a week by the time we got to service it. We drained the engine oil from every unit and cleaned water from carburetors and fuel tanks, started each unit and let it run for several minutes. Shut it off, drained oil and refilled, sometimes twice, but I don't remember hearing of any engine failures resulting. Of course we changed oil in transmissions, etc. also. I said all that to make the point that if one has the time, the vehicle may be "fixable". As to the value of the car, I can't say, obviously he has no insurance on the vehicle itself or you wouldn't be asking. If there are any good parts yards locally, they might give you an idea of the value. Sounds like the wrecker driver wants to make a fast buck.

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